Zoë. Texas.
I like lots of things.
Mostly funny things and pretty things. And feminism.
And occasionally fandoms.
Sometimes this blog is like a bedroom wall and sometimes it's like a trash bin.
My entire existence is extremely embarrassing anyway so let's keep it a secret.
...
"I asked the sun 'tell me about the big bang,' and the sun said 'it hurts to become'"- Andrea Gibson.

precumming:

adorkoftheworld:

precumming:

wow the date today is the same if you read it backwards 4/16/14.. this wont happen again for another 5,000 years..

this happens again tomorrow

nobody asked you

(via theflawstobeingcrazy)

dancinglashatumbai:

the gay agenda

or as i call it

the homoschedule 

(via wibblywobblytimeywimeygirl)

nicolascageholocaust:

We can only be friends if you’re kind of an asshole. Not full blown asshole because that’s no fun. And if you’re not an asshole at all then that won’t work either. A halfway asshole. Those are my kind of people.

(via theflawstobeingcrazy)

I am a queer woman and I’m not interested in hiding that fact, but it’s often challenging and complicated to try to be visible in public as queer. The cultural presumption of straightness is deeply ingrained, and many — perhaps most — people assume that everyone is heterosexual, despite any cues to the contrary. I’ve had people glance at my wedding photos — two women holding hands wearing white silk formalwear — and ask, “Oh, is that a friend of yours?”

Lindsay King-Miller writes in cosmopolitanmagazine about her Life as an Invisible Queer (via beyondxy)

(via musingsofauniversedisturber)

comic-chick:

probablymyself:

I took some reference photos for an oil painting I’m about to get started on. There is glitter everywhere. But it’s okay because my face looks like the night sky.

God Allie, you’re soooo #softgrunge

(via notamorningbird)

subconsciouscelebrity:

The meanings of a few names that people would typically think are ghetto and meaningless
LAKEISHA: a swahili name meaning “favorite one”
LATEEFAH: a north african name meaning “gentle and pleasant”
LATONIA: a latin name. latonia was the mother of diana in roman mythology
LATISHA: means “happiness”
TAKIYA: a north african name meaning “righteous”
ESHE. African Swahili name meaning “immortal”
KALISHA. Probably from the Galla word kalisha “sorcerer, wizard, witch doctor, magician”
LEENA (لينا). Another spelling of Arabic Lina (q.v.), meaning “softness.” In use in Africa.
MAKENA. African Kikuyu name meaning “the happy one.”
NIA. African Swahili name meaning “intention, life purpose, mind.”
MONIFA. African Yoruba name, meaning “I am luck,” from mo “I,” and ifa “profit, luck.”
NUBIA. Unisex. African. From the name of the country Nubia, meaning “land of gold,” from the Coptic word for gold.
AYANA : Ethiopian female name meaning “beautiful flower.”
SHANIKA. Unisex. African Bantu name, probably meaning “young one from the wilderness.”
SALINA. African. A name in use in Kenya. It may mean “merciful.”
TAMEKA. Another spelling of the African Congo name Tamika (q.v.), meaning “a twin,”
TAMELA. African Zulu name meaning “she who basks in the sun,”
AMARA. f. African. From the Swahili word amara, meaning “urgent business.”  Hindu. name meaning “immortal.” African. Ethiopian. Amharic amari, meaning “agreeable, pleasing.”
CHICHI f Western African, Igbo Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning “God”.
IMANI f & m Eastern African, Swahili, African American Means “faith” in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.
AZIZA f means “Respected. Darling.” Muslim,African, Egyptian, Arabic, Somali name meaning “gorgeous.
DALIA/DALILA f means “Gentle.” African, Arabic, American, Egyptian, Spanish, African, Hebrew
BIBI : An East African female name meaning “daughter of a king.” Also a Kiswahili word meaning “lady” or “grandmother.”
ADA : Ibo of Nigeria name for firstborn females.
ZENA : Ethiopian name meaning “news” or “fame.”
JAMILAH f means “Beautiful.” Arabic, Muslim, African
KALIFA f means “Chaste; holy.” African
RASHIDI/RASHIDA f means “Wise.” Egyptian African Swahili name meaning “righteous.”
TAJ means “Crown.” Indian,Sanskrit, African
FATUMA : Popular Swahili and Somali versions of the name Muslim name, FATIMA, meaning “weaned.”
NANA : Ghanaian name meaning “mother of the Earth.”
AJA : High Priestess of Mecca.
ADINA : Amharic of Ethiopia word sometimes used as a female name, meaning “she has saved.”
BALINDA : A Rutooro of Uganda name meaning “patience, endurance, fortitude.” (Balinda is also used as a male name in Uganda.)
FANTA : Guinea and Cote D’Ivoire name meaning “beautiful day.”
KAYA : Ghanaian name meaning “stay and don’t go back.”
LAYLA , LAILA , LEYLA , LEILA : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “born at night.”
SHANI : Swahili name meaning “marvelous.”
ANAYA : Ibo of Eastern Nigeria name meaning “look up to God.”
TANISHA , TANI : Hausa of W. Africa name meaning “born on Monday.”
ZAKIYA : Swahili name meaning “smart, intelligent.”
TITI : Nigerian name meaning “flower.”
SAFIA , SAFIYA , SAFIYEH , SAFIYYAH : Swahili and Arabic name meaning “pure and wise” or “lion’s share.”
LULU : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “pearl” or “precious.”
KADIJA , KHADIJA : Swahili name meaning “born prematurely.”
AMINA : Somali and Muslim female name meaning “trustful, honest” and referring to Muhammed’s mother. This name is popular with the Hausa of West Africa.

subconsciouscelebrity:

The meanings of a few names that people would typically think are ghetto and meaningless

LAKEISHA: a swahili name meaning “favorite one”

LATEEFAH: a north african name meaning “gentle and pleasant”

LATONIA: a latin name. latonia was the mother of diana in roman mythology

LATISHA: means “happiness”

TAKIYA: a north african name meaning “righteous”

ESHE. African Swahili name meaning “immortal”

KALISHA. Probably from the Galla word kalisha “sorcerer, wizard, witch doctor, magician”

LEENA (لينا). Another spelling of Arabic Lina (q.v.), meaning “softness.” In use in Africa.

MAKENA. African Kikuyu name meaning “the happy one.”

NIA. African Swahili name meaning “intention, life purpose, mind.”

MONIFA. African Yoruba name, meaning “I am luck,” from mo “I,” and ifa “profit, luck.”

NUBIA. Unisex. African. From the name of the country Nubia, meaning “land of gold,” from the Coptic word for gold.

AYANA : Ethiopian female name meaning “beautiful flower.”

SHANIKA. Unisex. African Bantu name, probably meaning “young one from the wilderness.”

SALINA. African. A name in use in Kenya. It may mean “merciful.”

TAMEKA. Another spelling of the African Congo name Tamika (q.v.), meaning “a twin,”

TAMELA. African Zulu name meaning “she who basks in the sun,”

AMARA. f. African. From the Swahili word amara, meaning “urgent business.”
Hindu. name meaning “immortal.”
African. Ethiopian. Amharic amari, meaning “agreeable, pleasing.”

CHICHI f Western African, Igbo
Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chi meaning “God”.

IMANI f & m Eastern African, Swahili, African American
Means “faith” in Swahili, ultimately of Arabic origin.

AZIZA f means “Respected. Darling.” Muslim,African, Egyptian, Arabic, Somali name meaning “gorgeous.

DALIA/DALILA f means “Gentle.”
African, Arabic, American, Egyptian, Spanish, African, Hebrew

BIBI : An East African female name meaning “daughter of a king.” Also a Kiswahili word meaning “lady” or “grandmother.”

ADA : Ibo of Nigeria name for firstborn females.

ZENA : Ethiopian name meaning “news” or “fame.”

JAMILAH f means “Beautiful.”
Arabic, Muslim, African

KALIFA f means “Chaste; holy.”
African

RASHIDI/RASHIDA f means
“Wise.” Egyptian African Swahili name meaning “righteous.”

TAJ means “Crown.”
Indian,Sanskrit, African

FATUMA : Popular Swahili and Somali versions of the name Muslim name, FATIMA, meaning “weaned.”

NANA : Ghanaian name meaning “mother of the Earth.”

AJA : High Priestess of Mecca.

ADINA : Amharic of Ethiopia word sometimes used as a female name, meaning “she has saved.”

BALINDA : A Rutooro of Uganda name meaning “patience, endurance, fortitude.” (Balinda is also used as a male name in Uganda.)

FANTA : Guinea and Cote D’Ivoire name meaning “beautiful day.”

KAYA : Ghanaian name meaning “stay and don’t go back.”

LAYLA , LAILA , LEYLA , LEILA : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “born at night.”

SHANI : Swahili name meaning “marvelous.”

ANAYA : Ibo of Eastern Nigeria name meaning “look up to God.”

TANISHA , TANI : Hausa of W. Africa name meaning “born on Monday.”

ZAKIYA : Swahili name meaning “smart, intelligent.”

TITI : Nigerian name meaning “flower.”

SAFIA , SAFIYA , SAFIYEH , SAFIYYAH : Swahili and Arabic name meaning “pure and wise” or “lion’s share.”

LULU : Swahili and Muslim name meaning “pearl” or “precious.”

KADIJA , KHADIJA : Swahili name meaning “born prematurely.”

AMINA : Somali and Muslim female name meaning “trustful, honest” and referring to Muhammed’s mother. This name is popular with the Hausa of West Africa.

(via hamamael)

chescaleigh:

Should actress Laverne Cox be included on the #TIME100? Ummm that’s a big ole’ HELLS YES! Click here to cast your vote!

chescaleigh:

Should actress Laverne Cox be included on the #TIME100? Ummm that’s a big ole’ HELLS YES! Click here to cast your vote!

(via theragingfeminist)

shiek927:

daisy-koopa:

breastmilkontherocks:

"Children are required to be in school, where their freedom is greatly restricted, far more than most adults would tolerate in their workplaces. In recent decades we’ve been compelling them to spend ever more time in this kind of setting, and there’s strong evidence that this is causing psychological damage to many of them. And as scientists have investigated how children naturally learn, they’ve realized that kids do so most deeply and fully, and with greatest enthusiasm, in conditions that are almost opposite to those of school….Most people assume that the basic design of today’s schools emerged from scientific evidence about how children learn. But nothing could be further from the truth. Schools as we know them today are a product of history, not research.   …. Research has shown that people of all ages learn best when they are self-motivated, pursuing answers to questions that reflect their personal interests and achieving goals that they’ve set for themselves. Under such conditions, learning is usually joyful. The evidence for all of this is obvious to anyone who’s watched a child grow from infancy to school age. Through their own efforts, children figure out how to walk, run, jump, and climb. They learn from scratch their native language, and with that, they learn to assert their will, argue, amuse, annoy, befriend, charm, and ask questions.  ….
They do all of this before anyone, in any systematic way, tries to teach them anything. This amazing drive and capacity to learn does not turn itself off when children reach five or six. But we turn it off with our coercive system of schooling.”

yes.

YES YES YES YES YES

shiek927:

daisy-koopa:

breastmilkontherocks:

"Children are required to be in school, where their freedom is greatly restricted, far more than most adults would tolerate in their workplaces. In recent decades we’ve been compelling them to spend ever more time in this kind of setting, and there’s strong evidence that this is causing psychological damage to many of them. And as scientists have investigated how children naturally learn, they’ve realized that kids do so most deeply and fully, and with greatest enthusiasm, in conditions that are almost opposite to those of school….
Most people assume that the basic design of today’s schools emerged from scientific evidence about how children learn. But nothing could be further from the truth.
Schools as we know them today are a product of history, not research.

….
Research has shown that people of all ages learn best when they are self-motivated, pursuing answers to questions that reflect their personal interests and achieving goals that they’ve set for themselves. Under such conditions, learning is usually joyful.
The evidence for all of this is obvious to anyone who’s watched a child grow from infancy to school age. Through their own efforts, children figure out how to walk, run, jump, and climb. They learn from scratch their native language, and with that, they learn to assert their will, argue, amuse, annoy, befriend, charm, and ask questions.
….

They do all of this before anyone, in any systematic way, tries to teach them anything.
This amazing drive and capacity to learn does not turn itself off when children reach five or six. But we turn it off with our coercive system of schooling.”

yes.

YES YES YES YES YES

(via cumbercutest)

narwhal-noir:

I took my girlfriend to an improv show the other night and during intermission we were passionately arguing over whether half a 5 Hour Energy shot would give you 2.5 hours of energy or 5 hours of half-assed energy so we turned around to ask the opinions of the three people behind us and one of them said “Are all your arguments like this because we heard you in the lobby earlier fighting over the right way to pronounce ‘egg’?”

(via orphaneren)